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If you are receiving The Iowa Bowhunter and not receiving IBA email updates from your board,
please contact Randy Taylor at tayphoto@netins.net.
Many of the emails sent out to members are getting rejected for various reasons.
If you have a new email address please contact Randy Taylor.
These emails are very important as they contain legislative information and other related IBA information.

 
 
3D Shootout

This year's IOWA GAMES 3D SHOOT will be held at
South Central Bowhunters of Iowa in Derby, Iowa
on July 15 &16, 2017.

The South Central Bowhunters of Iowa range is located at:
43814 US Highway 65.  
Watch for the signs.


For more information contact: 
JD McDonald 641-203-1029  

IBA Shootout
 

2016 Shootout Results
- (8/3/16)

2016 Border Brigade Results

2016 Mid Iowa Archers Results

2015 Fall Festival Results

2015 Shootout Results

 
 
 

I've talked in the past of how much I enjoy using a decoy. This year proved its worthiness again. On November 17th I was perched in my tree where deer pass through from big timber to big timber. This area is terrible in October as I have sat there all day in past years and never seen a doe more less a buck at times. But come rut time the bucks pass through this thinly 150 yard long timber stretch and with my decoy in the open pasture it makes it very visible to them.
Before first light I could hear a deer under twenty yards behind me moving east to west but I couldn't see it. It was just legal shooting time but a heavy overcast was prolonging shooting light. Within less than a minute, a second deer was moving through, on the same course. At eighteen yards I could see parts of a figure of a deer. I could see antlers, but not their size. So I watched as the deer exited to the west, onto the neighbors’ property, following the exact spot over the the fence the first deer cleared.
Rut is on! Within 4 minutes or so I turned to look behind me and there was a buck with his nose to the ground, traveling the outside edge of the tree line. At first he was heading west hard but he backed up and dove into the tree line towards me. He was smelling the earlier path of the doe. He too walked through at 18 yards, but still to dark to make out how big his antlers were, so I let him walk. He reached the fence where the two previous deer jumped and I assumed he was doing the same. I just that quick hung my bow back on its hanger, as I looked his way he had turned around, spotted my decoy out in front of me and came trotting in. I could see plenty of antlers as he comes down the treeline ready to fight. 
I draw my bow at sixteen yards, I've got the buck dead to rights as he’s focused on the decoy. I draw but can’t see enough light through my peep. I look around it, hold it out in front of me, back to my eye,(no go). The buck walks sideways towards the decoy, as he clears the overhanging branches, hes at twelve yards. I've got a open shot, I can now see my pins through the peep and just that quick the arrow is gone. The buck bolts pass the decoy as hard as he can go, up-hill, in the open pasture. At the top of the hill he stops and hunches up, (O no that means too far back). The arrow went clean through and was sticking in the ground.
I watched the buck slowly walk another 100 yards and enter the neighbors’ property into big timber. I waited four hours before looking for blood where I last seen the deer enter the trees. I found blood but tracking would be difficult. With one step at a time I proceeded through the timber as visibility with all the oak leaves was good. A three hour tracking job covering 200 yards up hill led the buck out of the timber into the next drainage.
I decided to leave the deer over night to not jump him. I get along with the neighbors as they bowhunt as well and asked them to check down by their pond the next day. I felt this deer was going to walk his way to water with that type of hit.
The next morning I moved through the valley, favoring a westerly direction, as there is a creek over the hill. I walked the creek to the north than to the south and back to the top of the hill. This was four hours of hiking with no luck.
Exhausted and frustrated at the shot I made I decided to press on to the next valley to the south. Before I entered the timber, my phone rings, its the neighbor, they were at the pond on his property and found my buck dead in the open pasture. The deer had not made it to the water and looked as if he died while walking. Over all I would guess the buck traveled some 500 yards.
Determined tracking played a role in finding this deer but ultimately using the decoy produced this deer for the taking. I had a few deer a week before pay no attention to my decoy but this buck was leaving the area when he turned and spotted it and came back to bow range producing a successful season.
I always put the decoy in the open where deer can see it. I know that movement is key, so I hang two squares of toilet paper from dental floss under the tail. Always put your decoy where you want to shoot. I use carry lite decoys and stash them by my trees under burlap and limbs.
If you still haven't tried a decoy, I encourage you to do so as it has beyond question produced several of my bucks over the years.

Click here for full text with photos

 
 

Over the past year there were 35 cases reviewed by TIP.  These TIPs resulted in fines and liquidated damages to date of $120,000 with a few cases yet to be adjudicated.  The TIP board approved rewards of $11,000.00.
Each year TIP recommends three Conservation Officers from the list of cases submitted to TIP for rewards review.  The cases are reviewed by your IBA Board and one Officer is selected to receive the award.
The recipient of this year’s award is the Conservation Officer for Louisa County, Lucas Dever.
Luke is originally from Goose Lake in Clinton County. His first job with the DNR was as a seasonal water patrol officer on Lake Okoboji in 2007. He earned his degree in Conservation Management from Upper Iowa University. In 2010 he became a Conservation Officer and was assigned to Worth and Winnebago Counties. He transferred to Louisa County in 2013.
Officer Dever submitted three cases for TIP review.
The first case is becoming all too common in Iowa; a TIP was received about a deer that may have been shot with a rifle.  Officer Dever responded to the area and located a buck that appeared to have been severely wounded by a shot fired from a rifle.  The Officer ended the bucks suffering and made contact with the suspect. After brief questioning, the suspect admitted to shooting the deer with a Kalashnikov style rifle.  He was charged with unlawful method of take and not in possession of a valid deer tag.  He was convicted and paid 4000 in fines and liquidated damages, he also forfeited the rifle. 
The second case is also a recurring theme; Officer Dever received a call from an informant in late November saying he had heard what sounded like shotgun blasts in a hunting area. The informant provided the Officer with a license plate number. The Officer went to the scene and found drag marks and blood.  After running the plate number the Officer went to the address and found four men processing a 10 point buck.  The deer was not tagged.  When asked how the deer was harvested the suspect produced a tag for first shotgun season.  Officer Dever pointed out that the shotgun season had not started yet.  The poacher was charged with 2 counts and the deer along with the gun were seized
The third case could provide the plot for an episode of CSI. There is Crime Scene Investigation complete with DNA analysis, hair sample analysis, ballistic evidence, suspects turning on other suspects, drugs, drug paraphernalia, stolen goods and the public providing tips and information.
It started in January 2016 with several reports of dead deer near Morning Sun. Some with their antlers cut off and some with their entire heads removed. Officer Dever set up surveillance night after night but the poachers always seemed to hit a different part of the county.
He would gather evidence from the poaching scenes often using a metal detector to try and recover bullets and casings. He would have to take deer into the local wildlife shop to thaw so he could remove the bullets, if there were any, because most of the shots from the rifles were through and through.  
Then the tables started to turn, he received a call about a shell casing found on a road near a dead deer, the caller also gave a description of the vehicle used in the poaching incident. From that description the Officer was able to come up with a “person of interest”.
A couple of days later our Officer talked to a local who was a friend of a friend of the “person of interest”. The next day the local was able to provide names of two people who became suspects in the case. The local also provided the Officer and County Sherriff with details of drugs and stolen goods he had seen at one of the suspect’s residences. He also told the CO the location of another poaching scene. Our Officer was able to gather more evidence at that scene including a flashlight with one of the suspects names engraved on it.
The day after that our Officer received another call about several dead deer. He responded to the caller’s residence. They took the CO to the pile of dead deer where more evidence was gathered. When they returned to the callers residence one of the suspects was there. He told the Officer he was there to clear his name. He said the other suspect had done all of the poaching, he gave information on the guns the other suspect had used and where the other suspect was keeping the poached deer heads and antlers.
Officer Dever didn’t tip his hand that he had this guy’s engraved flashlight. He simply gave the suspect his card and told the suspect to call him if he heard anything more.
Late the next day the CO received information that the suspects were planning on getting rid of the evidence. The information was so detailed it included what type and color of boxes the suspects were putting the evidence in.
Officer Dever obtained search warrants for both residences. The warrants were executed simultaneously. Remember the guy who tried to clear his name? The same guy whose name was on a flashlight recovered at one of the scenes? He was the main poacher and criminal. At his residence they found a .223 bolt action rifle, 15 loose antlers, 8 deer heads, a raptor foot, a fox, controlled substances and drug paraphernalia along with a quantity of methamphetamine and marijuana. Last but not least they also recovered the sawzall and grinder the suspects used to cut off the antlers and heads. The search of the other suspect’s residence turned up a .243 and .223 rifle and 2 deer heads.
Hair and DNA samples from the heads seized with the warrants along with hair and DNA samples found at the scenes were sent to the Wyoming Wildlife Forensics Lab for testing. The guns and bullets were sent to the Iowa DCI crime labs.
The Wildlife lab was able to match 18 deer from samples seized to the poaching scenes. There was a total of 54 wildlife charges against the two resulting in total fines and liquidated damages of $45,000.
We thank and congratulate Officer Dever for a job well done. We would also like to thank all of the Conservation Officers for serving the sportsmen and women of Iowa and helping to conserve and protect our hunting, fishing and fur bearing resources.

 
 

The IBA has a new gold level sponsor. Whink products developed a line of scent eliminating, scent free and scent controlling products in conjunction with Mossy Oak.
Whink is an Iowa based company that has been in Eldora for 70 years.  They are best known as “Americas Household Problem Solvers”. Whink features a long line of household cleaners and stain removers. Whink has taken their proven ability and expertise in finding cures to everyday cleaning problems to finding a cure for your odor problem when in the tree stand.
Whink has developed scent free and scent removing laundry detergent, stain presoak and dryer sheets. For in the field use they have developed scent eliminating body wipes and spray. None of their scent control products contain UV brighteners.
In research conducted at Iowa State University it was shown that Whink Mossy Oak scent elimination products remove more isovolaric acids and thimols, the part of your sweat that causes odors, than the other leading scent eliminators on the market today. 
When you are sitting in your turkey blind this spring and run out of things to ponder while waiting for Mr. Hooks to strut by, think of isovolaric acids and thimols. Isovolaric acids cause the eye watering, nose burning, gag inducing stench of rotten sneakers on a hot summer day and thimols are responsible for the odor added to natural and LP gas as well as the skunk spray that you avoided on the walk to your blind.
The Whink Mossy Oak product I’m most interested in is their scent free, scent elimination pre soak stain remover. I’ve gutted plenty of deer but it always seems that I end up looking like a character from a horror movie. I have tried other scent free detergents as a pretreatment but the stains are still in my cammos. I will be giving this product a try next fall, or maybe even this spring if I get messy with Mr. Hooks.
So when you are looking for scent control products think about purchasing a product that is Iowa grown and Iowa State proven, think Whinks.
Follow this link to the Whink Mossy Oak web site:
http://www.whink.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=cEcommerce.dspProducts&CategoryID=2454

 
 

by Robin Klemme

Deer numbers are way down in the NW corner this season. Way down in Plymouth and Woodbury as most bowhunters reported low sightings. We had another bout with EHD especially in western Plymouth County. One particular landowner found 26 dead deer on their property. I don't know if this wasteful disease will ever disappear in our future once the organisms have found their way into our Eco system.
On a lighter note Elliot Smith from Sibley took a nice buck in his grounds and has an excellent trail cam pic of a mountain lion. There is no doubt from the pic as to what it is. Congratulations Elliot!
My son Trent took his first buck with a bow as he just started bowhunting three years ago. First time out in October, the first 15 minutes of the morning. Trent was going to shoot a doe, but an 8-point buck walked up and sniffed his stand while hunting the river behind my house. Well done Trent!
I never got to hunt in October due to too much work. I didn't hunt every day in Nov like I planned either. By November 17th, I was in the tree for the 6th time and thanks totally to my decoy, I shot a buck.  That day appeared to me to be the heaviest rut period this year.
Hunt safe, always carry a flash light to and from your stand.

 
 

The Johnson County Archers (JCA) are celebrating 16 years of operation at the University of Iowa’s McBride Nature Recreation Area between North Liberty and Solon on Mehaffey Bridge Road. While we can’t take credit for constructing this wonderful facility, that was the Whitetail Bowmen, we did resurrect it from the weeds. We added the storage shed, modern backstops, and expanded the trails to accommodate 20 targets on each of two courses. All archery related facilities are maintained by JCA for public use. As our budget allows, we install targets on the practice range, and keep a “jug” course up on one side.
We are hosting three public 3-D shoots this year in April, June, and July. The first is a 20 target 3-D pancake shoot held on Sunday April 9; the second is a 40 target 3-D shoot held on June 17 & 18; and the last one is the second leg of the IBA Shootout, a 40 target 3-D shoot held on July 22 & 23. All of our shoots include a pavilion where we serve food; and a practice range just outside of the pavilion. Our courses and facilities have been established for some time, so we now focus our efforts on making the shoots fun and interesting. We have built several novelty games such as the ping pong ball blower, spinner, walking tom, weaving zombie, iron buck, and a game called balloon drop. Which one we bring out depends on the weather, wind, who’s setting it up, and what kind of mood we feel like at the time. Each time is a surprise even to us.
We also build custom 3-D targets. These creations are built from the remains of worn out targets, and pieced together like Frankenstein’s monster. They are unique and add an element of surprise to the course. You never know what’s around the next corner. It is also not uncommon for us to include group or herd shots, as well as scenes - a grizzly taking down a deer, a coyote stalking a carp, or an alligator lunging at an antelope.
We know that not everyone can join our club but we sincerely hope that you will consider visiting us at one of our 3-D shoots in the near future. Operating as we do on public property, our main function is to provide a place for people to enjoy and experience 3-D archery at the best possible level we can. We can only continue to do that if you come to our shoots and bring your friends with you.

From all of the Johnson County Archers, straight shooting and here’s hoping we see you soon.

www.JohnsonCountyArchers.com
on Facebook, search for Johnson County Archers

 
 
   
 
   
Iowa Games  
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Legislative News
 
 
DNR Director: 'Relief' Needed to Maintain Fish and Wildlife Trust Fund
The Iowa Department of Natural Resources will have to cut staff and services provided by the Fish and Wildlife Trust Fund
if the state doesn't approve a revenue increase, Director Chuck Gipp said Tuesday.

The trust is funded primarily through fishing and hunting license fees. Both are $19 annually for Iowa residents. Those fees
are approved by the Legislature and support a number of services across the state including fish hatcheries, boat ramps, wildlife
management, education and research. Gipp, speaking at a budget hearing before Gov. Terry Branstad, noted fishing license fees
were last increased more than a decade ago. He said revenue has remained relatively stable since then, but the general cost of
doing business has increased as things like health care, gas and equipment costs rise.

“It’s been a challenge," Gipp said. "So without some type of relief there, we’re going to be reducing (staffing and services)
significantly – about 10 to 15 percent by next year."

Gipp said he's encouraged advocacy groups that represent hunters and fishermen to contact their state representatives
about raising the licensing fees.

"This is your trust fund. You’re the ones that benefit," he said he told them. "... So if you want to continue to receive this
service we’ve been providing you, you’re going to have to be the advocate for the revenue that’s necessary to provide those services."

Branstad said after the presentation he is "neutral" about raising the fees.

Gipp said that like other state agencies, the Department of Natural Resources has infrastructure projects it needs to address.
“The newest facility we have is a fish hatchery at Rathbun (Lake),” Gipp says. “But that’s 25 years old and the liners of those
fish ponds that grow the fish are now 25 years old and need replacements, so you’re looking at $1 million or more just to replace
that type of facility.”

The department requested a "status quo" budget for the next fiscal year without any increases over the previous year's funding.
The department spends about $132 million annually, with about $15 million of that coming from the state's general fund and
about $42 million coming from the Fish and Wildlife Trust Fund.

Branstad will hear from all state agencies before issuing his budget proposal to the Legislature at the start of the 2017 legislative session.
Lawmakers will return to Des Moines in January to begin work on the budget and other state issues.
 

Suspect HD Reports - 2016
I have received reports of 192 suspect HD cases from 29 counties through the end of November with just one report still
needing some clarification. The last reports of fresh suspect deer came from Boone and Warren counties that had reported
mortalities during the first three weeks of November. I will continue to take reports and will keep them on file, however, the
map will continue to represent suspected mortalities through 30 November to avoid duplicate reports from shotgun season
hunters (this is consistent with previous years).

Suspect HD Reports
 

 

DNR Listening Sessions

Iowa State University White-Tailed Deer Fawn Study Flyer - 12/15/16

 
2016 Legislative Updates
Iowa Legislative Report - 3/5/16
Iowa Legislative Report
- 2/3/16
Iowa Legislative Report - 2/16/16
 
2015 Legislative Updates

Iowa Legislative Report #15
Iowa Legislative Report #14
Iowa Legislative Report #13

Iowa Legislative Report #12
Iowa Legislative Report #10
Iowa Legislative Reports #8 and #9
Iowa Legislative Report #7
Iowa Legislative Report #6

Iowa Legislative Report #5
 
 

The IBA Legislative Committee has put together a list of important people that we must contact this legislative session.
It's critical that they hear from the hunting community about current legislation and our concerns with the downward
trend of the deer herd.

We need more than bowhunters to get involved. Please forward this to all of your friends.
It doesn't matter if they are gun deer hunters, fur trappers, fishermen or upland bird hunters.
We are all in this together.

   
1. As issues arise that require the attention of many of us, or if you simply have a personal concern, please contact your legislator, make a phone call and write an email. Most legislators have informal meetings in their home town. Please take the time to sit in on one of these meetings. Get to know your elected officials on a first name basis. As always be polite and respectful. They are just like us, hardworking people trying to do a tough job. Most of them are not hunters. They need help understanding why or how hunting impacts our state. It is up to us to help them “get it”.
 
2. Contact members of the Natural Resource Committees, they have the final word as to which legislation goes to the house and senate floor for consideration.
 
3. Contact the Governor’s office. The Governor elected not to follow the DNR's recommendations that antlerless tags be cut in many counties. It's time that wildlife management practices are left up to the professionals not special interest groups.
 
4. Couple quick facts to use:
A. At the end of late ML season harvest numbers are down 5% compared to last year.
Number of tags sold is almost identical to last year.
      B. Currently the data indicates the projected statewide postseason deer population for 2012
(May population) will be over 30% lower (31%) than it was in 2006.
 
Find Your Legislators
Very easy to use, Ctrl + Click to follow link.
Then just type in your address and zip code.
All your legislators will pop up state and federal.
   
   
Natural Resources
All legislation pertaining to hunting & fishing will go through these committees
   
   
Senate Committee
Chair
Dick L. Dearden
, D
District 16,
Vice Chair
Chris Brase
, D
District 46
Ranking Member
Ken Rozenboom, R
District 40
       
       
Brian Schoenjahn, D
District 32
Joe M. Seng, D
District 45
Tom Shipley, R
District 11
Dan Zumbach, R
District 48
       
Jerry Behn, R
District 24
Joe Bolkcom, D
District 43
David Johnson, R
District 1
Kevin Kinney, D
District 39
       
Janet Petersen, D
District 18
Amanda Ragan, D
District 27
   
       
       
House Committee
   
Chair
Brian Moore, R
District 58
Vice Chair
Dean Fisher, R
District 72
Ranking Member
Curt Hanson, D
District 82
       
       
Rob Bacon, R
District 48
Clel Baudler, R
District 20
Liz Bennett, D
District 65
Brian Best , R
District 12
       
Chris Hall, D
District 13
Lisa Heddens, D
District 46
John H. Wills, R
District 1
Jarad J. Klein, R
District 78
       
Kevin Koester, R
District 38
Jim Lykam , D
District 89
Dave Maxwell, R
District 76
Helen Miller, D
District 9
       
Norlin Mommsen, R
District 97
Scott Ourth , D
District 26
Ross Paustian, R
District 92
Patti Ruff, D
District 56
       
Phyllis Thede, D
District 93
     
   
   
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Member Stories
Submit your story by emailing Randy Taylor
 
 
Member Story
Love My Decoy
by Robin Klemme

I've talked in the past of how much I enjoy using a decoy. This year proved its worthiness again. On November 17th I was perched in my tree where deer pass through from big timber to big timber. This area is terrible in October as I have sat there all day in past years and never seen a doe more less a buck at times. But come rut time the bucks pass through this thinly 150 yard long timber stretch and with my decoy in the open pasture it makes it very visible to them.

Before first light I could hear a deer under twenty yards behind me moving east to west but I couldn't see it. It was just legal shooting time but a heavy overcast was prolonging shooting light. Within less than a minute, a second deer was moving through, on the same course. At eighteen yards I could see parts of a figure of a deer. I could see antlers, but not their size. So I watched as the deer exited to the west, onto the neighbors’ property, following the exact spot over the the fence the first deer cleared.

Rut is on! Within 4 minutes or so I turned to look behind me and there was a buck with his nose to the ground, traveling the outside edge of the tree line. At first he was heading west hard but he backed up and dove into the tree line towards me. He was smelling the earlier path of the doe. He too walked through at 18 yards, but still to dark to make out how big his antlers were, so I let him walk. He reached the fence where the two previous deer jumped and I assumed he was doing the same. I just that quick hung my bow back on its hanger, as I looked his way he had turned around, spotted my decoy out in front of me and came trotting in. I could see plenty of antlers as he comes down the treeline ready to fight.

I draw my bow at sixteen yards, I've got the buck dead to rights as he’s focused on the decoy. I draw but can’t see enough light through my peep. I look around it, hold it out in front of me, back to my eye,(no go). The buck walks sideways towards the decoy, as he clears the overhanging branches, hes at twelve yards. I've got a open shot, I can now see my pins through the peep and just that quick the arrow is gone. The buck bolts pass the decoy as hard as he can go, up-hill, in the open pasture. At the top of the hill he stops and hunches up, (O no that means too far back). The arrow went clean through and was sticking in the ground.

I watched the buck slowly walk another 100 yards and enter the neighbors’ property into big timber. I waited four hours before looking for blood where I last seen the deer enter the trees. I found blood but tracking would be difficult. With one step at a time I proceeded through the timber as visibility with all the oak leaves was good. A three hour tracking job covering 200 yards up hill led the buck out of the timber into the next drainage. 
 I decided to leave the deer over night to not jump him. I get along with the neighbors as they bowhunt as well and asked them to check down by their pond the next day. I felt this deer was going to walk his way to water with that type of hit.

The next morning I moved through the valley, favoring a westerly direction, as there is a creek over the hill. I walked the creek to the north than to the south and back to the top of the hill. This was four hours of hiking with no luck.

Exhausted and frustrated at the shot I made I decided to press on to the next valley to the south. Before I entered the timber, my phone rings, its the neighbor, they were at the pond on his property and found my buck dead in the open pasture. The deer had not made it to the water and looked as if he died while walking. Over all I would guess the buck traveled some 500 yards.

Determined tracking played a role in finding this deer but ultimately using the decoy produced this deer for the taking. I had a few deer a week before pay no attention to my decoy but this buck was leaving the area when he turned and spotted it and came back to bow range producing a successful season.

I always put the decoy in the open where deer can see it. I know that movement is key, so I hang two squares of toilet paper from dental floss under the tail. Always put your decoy where you want to shoot. I use carry lite decoys and stash them by my trees under burlap and limbs.

If you still haven't tried a decoy, I encourage you to do so as it has beyond question produced several of my bucks over the years.

 
Member Story
Carson McCabe
“An Unforgettable Morning”

November 1, 2014
Its 7:00 in the morning on November 1st, 2014 and I arrive to the stand. I sat there for about 45 minutes at a balmy 22 degrees. The sun was just beginning to come up when I look towards the fence line and see a doe. I bleated at her and she came right in to about 25-30 yards before she got really spooky like something was up. All of a sudden she picked her head up and wouldn’t move it. I looked to my right and saw a big body. Turns out it was a buck with a spike on one side and a fork on the other. He came to about 20-25 yards and I was going to shoot but, then he got really spooky like something was up. His ears went back and all of a sudden this nice 8 came walking in to 20 yards. As he was walking behind a tree I drew my bow, he stopped, I picked my spot and let the arrow fly. It looked like it hit him right behind the shoulder, if not in the shoulder. He ran away at a steady run and I saw my arrow fall out as he turned to run another direction. I sat down and did a few fist pumps and then reached for my phone to text my dad that I shot one. My dad said “Good job buddy! We will give him a while.” It was about 9:30 when my dad came over and we started tracking. We found my arrow and turns out it broke off inside of him when he ran off. We looked at the blood on the remaining part of my arrow, it was bright red and I saw bubbles. We found the first blood and it was about another 10 feet before we found another little spot of blood and the same pattern all the way until we found him lying in an area of thistles and bushes by a creek. He traveled a total of about 100 yds. I walked up to him and made sure he was dead and then picked up his rack and we took a few pictures, I tagged him and then we drug him out of there. After that my dad and I field dressed him and we found the other half of my arrow stuck in the center of his heart and the rest is history.
   
Member Story
Daryl Landsgard - IBA Area Rep

These bucks were both taken Nov. 3rd, during our annual family bowhunt at the Stabbin Cabin (Not quite sure how our cabin got its name). I rattled in 4 bucks at once around 8a.m. Of course, the big one stayed out in the middle of the field with the ladies, but this guy was giving me such a show scraping and thrashing cedars, I couldn't resist. Plus, our annual hunts hadn't produced much in kills the last couple years, and it was time to break the ice. My shot wasn't the greatest, but he went down in sight so I must have hit an artery in there somewhere. By the time I got him cleaned out I had to run to attend a funeral, so the morning hunt was over.

Afternoon rolled around and I sent my son to the timber reserve to hunt an obscure trail that runs around the rim of the hill. It's a stand where you see cruising bucks or nothing, so we were all in, so to speak. He texted me on the walk in,"Lots of deer moving, think I got in without spooking anything." About a half hour later he sent me a picture text of his buck and the celebrating began. He had to watch this guy approach for a couple minutes and made a perfect shot at 5 yards for a 50 yard recovery. I have to say tho, what made this hunt special was that it was my son's first deer since he was 15. He's now 23 and about to graduate from ISU with a degree in computer engineering. He spent a few years chasing other dreams and planning his escape from Iowa when he graduated. Luckily for me, the cabin, the hunting, and the time spent around the woodstove swapping lies, stories and discussing life with family and friends, brought him back around. Most of you guys are way younger than me, but I hope you can all experience someday what I got to this past weekend. When you clink beer bottles with your grownup son, or daughter, in toast to a successful hunt and time spent together it should bring tears to your old man eyes too. Good luck to all and please support the IBA.

 
Member Photos
Submit your photos by emailing Randy Taylor
Click here to view Deer harvest photos
Click here to view Other Animal harvest photos
 
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